The Hooker Diaries

A year of crocheting (or knitting, if I'm so inclined) at least three new things a month.

peacecorps:

During her service, Peace Corps Volunteer Rachael Saler taught Filipino women to crochet discarded plastic bags into colorful handbags and change purses as a way to engage local communities in business ventures, and teach environmental awareness and recycling. Since the Bag-O Plastic project launched in August 2010, more than 100 women from Bago City in the Philippines have sold 200 bags, earning 63,000 pesos (about $1,500).

For each bag that is sold, the woman who crocheted it receives 80 percent of the earnings. The other 20 percent goes toward the purchasing of zipper, runners, tags, etc. Each woman collects, segregates and washes plastic bags to be crocheted and sold. Women have also begun exchanging plastic bags for rice with other merchants and started plastic-bag collection bins in local commercial areas.

Rachael, who holds a master’s degree from Columbia University and a bachelor’s from Syracuse University, credits her mother for the Bag-O Plastic idea. When her parents visited in 2009, Saler’s mother told her to consider crocheting recycled plastic bags into handbags. Rachael was so inspired by the project she extended her Peace Corps service for a third year to continue it. She completed her Peace Corps service in December 2011.

Crocheting for social justice!

(via laughterkey)

knittingandcrochet:

sainsburysgirl:

safestoptions:

Coping Skills
*Trigger Warning: Self-Harm*
One of the first things that I discussed with a therapist was “coping skills”. There is no doubt in my mind that others have heard these same words when it comes to the addiction of self-harm. One suggestion that my therapist had for me when I felt an “urge” was to do something with my hands - stay busy!I ended up finding solace in knitting! You may think it is too hard to learn, or will take to long to get the hang of it, but that is not true. My mother-in-law taught me to knit, and it took me two days to get the hang of it. I cannot do anymore than knitting and purling stitches (the simple stuff), but I love it! Not only does it keep my hands busy, but I am making something as well. I have only ever made scarves, and yet, it has been such a gift to learn. Whenever I feel an “urge”, or even a bit of anxiety, I will pull out my latest knitting project and get to work. It is incredibly therapeutic. As well, it is always fun to pick out new yarns - colors, material, size. What coping skills have you found beneficial?

Although I don’t self harm, I do find that knitting helps massively with my aniexty. It either relaxs me or confuses me so much I have no time to be anxious!

I’m so happy you have found coping through knitting. I’m working on my doctorate in psychology and I am always challenging people to find creative coping skills. Knitting is so therapeutic and you create something beautiful. Keep it up, both of you! ((Hugs))
#tw: self harm #knitting #copingskills #mentalhealth

knittingandcrochet:

sainsburysgirl:

safestoptions:

Coping Skills

*Trigger Warning: Self-Harm*

One of the first things that I discussed with a therapist was “coping skills”. There is no doubt in my mind that others have heard these same words when it comes to the addiction of self-harm. One suggestion that my therapist had for me when I felt an “urge” was to do something with my hands - stay busy!

I ended up finding solace in knitting! You may think it is too hard to learn, or will take to long to get the hang of it, but that is not true. My mother-in-law taught me to knit, and it took me two days to get the hang of it. I cannot do anymore than knitting and purling stitches (the simple stuff), but I love it! Not only does it keep my hands busy, but I am making something as well. I have only ever made scarves, and yet, it has been such a gift to learn. Whenever I feel an “urge”, or even a bit of anxiety, I will pull out my latest knitting project and get to work. It is incredibly therapeutic. 

As well, it is always fun to pick out new yarns - colors, material, size. 

What coping skills have you found beneficial?

Although I don’t self harm, I do find that knitting helps massively with my aniexty. It either relaxs me or confuses me so much I have no time to be anxious!

I’m so happy you have found coping through knitting. I’m working on my doctorate in psychology and I am always challenging people to find creative coping skills. Knitting is so therapeutic and you create something beautiful. Keep it up, both of you! ((Hugs))

#tw: self harm #knitting #copingskills #mentalhealth

(Source: , via stitch-please)

I am currently knitting my VERY FIRST SWEATER.
Fans of this blog (lolololol) will remember that I DID, at one point, make a t-shirt. However, that was done in crochet, a technique in which I find picking up stitches to be worlds easier. Knitting something seems to be a lot more puzzlework, whereas you can grow crochet out in different directions pretty seamlessly with minimal effort. 
I am nervously approaching the part where I have to start doing some neck shaping, which is completely alien to me. I worry about messing it up, so I think I’m going to use my very first lifeline. (Here’s the part where more expert knitters laugh a little bit because you’re really only supposed to need lifelines for complicated, lacey pieces. Hey! I still think it will be helpful.)
I hope this worrrrrks!
(P.S. The yarn is Knit Picks’ Billow and it is fabulous.)

I am currently knitting my VERY FIRST SWEATER.

Fans of this blog (lolololol) will remember that I DID, at one point, make a t-shirt. However, that was done in crochet, a technique in which I find picking up stitches to be worlds easier. Knitting something seems to be a lot more puzzlework, whereas you can grow crochet out in different directions pretty seamlessly with minimal effort. 

I am nervously approaching the part where I have to start doing some neck shaping, which is completely alien to me. I worry about messing it up, so I think I’m going to use my very first lifeline. (Here’s the part where more expert knitters laugh a little bit because you’re really only supposed to need lifelines for complicated, lacey pieces. Hey! I still think it will be helpful.)

I hope this worrrrrks!

(P.S. The yarn is Knit Picks’ Billow and it is fabulous.)

Yet another finished project. This one’s Stephen West’s Westward Hat, the pattern for which (thankfully!) was already in my possession because I’d been smart enough to purchase the full e-book when I got the pattern for my dad’s Meadowbrook scarf.

My baby sister — for the first time! — asked me to make something for her. She wanted a hat to keep her warm on skiing trips. I thought this one was very cool — not too girly, but with enough frills and fanciness to stay interesting. She even helped me pick out the yarn at Purl Soho

Please ignore the following:

  • the soullessness of my black eyes in the first picture.
  • the silly face my sister’s making in the second picture.
  • the hugeness of my own head relative to hers.

Here’s another FO I missed sharing with you!

In the past year or two I have become obsessed — obsessed! — with bees. All things beekeeping, honey, or honeycomb-related are just fascinating to me. (Perpetually in my queue is Anna Sudo’s Apis Dorsata shawl.)

Coincidentally, my new pal Heidi is an apiarist who helps run the hives at the White House.

This year, I participated in a “pay it forward” project, where I agreed to make something handmade for the first five people who asked, provided they do the same for five of their friends. Heidi was the first to ask. So I made her Grace Akhrem’s Bee Keeper’s Cowl

Unfortunately, the yarn Grace recommends is discontinued, so I used Valley Yarns Berkshire Bulky, which was on sale at yarn.com. BUT THEN! I ran out of the inner tube color (the gray) with only two rounds and a bind-off left to go, and the yarn was backordered for something like six weeks. So what should have been a quick weekend project took me months. 

Regardless, Heidi got it and has worn it at least once for a chilly day (presumably of beekeeping).

It’s been a hot minute since I shared any of my WIPs or FOs. 

These Falling Snow Stockings represent my very first foray into colorwork, and while they are fairly obviously amateur, I couldn’t be more thrilled with my entry-level results. 

They’re big, sturdy, attractive, and — best of all — super-fast. My first one (the red one) took me about a month of on-and-off work, because I was nervous about the new technique. My second one was worked up over the course of my Thanksgiving weekend. 

I’m glad to have done this project, not least because they were functional for the holiday season, but also because they gave me a kind of crash course in basic sock construction. This spring, I’m hoping to challenge myself by making the Denature socks for my science-nerd boyfriend. Stay tuned!